Dysphagia

Difficulty swallowing is also called dysphagia. It is usually a sign of a problem with your throat or esophagus - the muscular tube that moves food and liquids from the back of your mouth to your stomach.

Although dysphagia can happen to anyone, it is most common in older adults, babies, and people who have problems involving the nervous system. If you have a hard time swallowing once or twice, you probably do not have a medical problem. But if you have trouble swallowing on a regular basis, you may have a more serious problem that needs treatment.

Causes
Symptoms
Diagnosis
Treatment
Causes: 

Normally, the muscles in your throat and esophagus squeeze, or contract, to move food and liquids from your mouth to your stomach. Sometimes, though, food and liquids have trouble getting to your stomach.

There are two types of problems that can make it hard for food and liquids to travel down your esophagus:

A dry mouth can make dysphagia worse. This is because you may not have enough saliva to help move food out of your mouth and through your esophagus. A dry mouth can be caused by medicines or another health problem.

Symptoms: 

Dysphagia can come and go, be mild or severe, or get worse over time. If you have dysphagia, you may:

  • Have problems getting food or liquids to go down on the first try.
  • Gag, choke, or cough when you swallow.
  • Have food or liquids come back up through your throat, mouth, or nose after you swallow.
  • Feel like foods or liquids are stuck in some part of your throat or chest.
  • Have pain or pressure in the throat or chest when you swallow.
  • Lose weight because you are not getting enough food or liquid.
Diagnosis: 

If you are having difficulty swallowing, your doctor will ask questions about your symptoms and examine you. He or she will want to know if you have trouble swallowing solids and/or solids, where you think foods or liquids are getting stuck, etc. Based on your responses and exam findings, your doctor may then refer you to one of the following specialists:

To help find the cause of your dysphagia, you may need one or more tests, including:

  • X-rays. These provide pictures of your neck or chest.
  • A barium swallow. This is an X-ray of the throat and esophagus. Before the X-ray, you will drink a chalky liquid called barium. Barium coats the inside of your esophagus so that it shows up better on an X-ray.
  • Fluoroscopy. This test uses a type of barium swallow that allows your swallowing to be videotaped.
  • Esophagoscopy or upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. During these tests, a thin, flexible instrument called a scope is placed in your mouth and down your throat to look at your esophagus and perhaps your stomach and upper intestines
  • Manometry. During this test, a small tube is placed down your esophagus. The tube is attached to a computer that measures the pressure in your esophagus as you swallow.
  • pH monitoring, which tests how often acid from the stomach gets into the esophagus and how long it stays there.
Treatment: 

Your treatment will depend on what is causing your dysphagia. Treatment for dysphagia includes:

  • Exercises to strength and coordinate your swallowing muscles. You may also need to learn how to position your body or how to put food in your mouth to be able to swallow better.
  • Changing the foods you eat.
  • Dilation. In this treatment, a device is placed down your esophagus to carefully expand any narrow areas of your esophagus. You may need to have the treatment more than once.
  • Endoscopy. In some cases, a long, thin scope can be used to remove an object that is stuck in your esophagus.
  • Surgery. If you have something blocking your esophagus (such as a tumor or diverticula), you may need surgery to remove it. Surgery is also sometimes used in people who have a problem that affects the lower esophageal muscle (achalasia).
  • Medicines. If you have dysphagia related to GERD, heartburn, or esophagitis, prescription medicines may help prevent stomach acid from entering your esophagus. Infections in your esophagus are often treated with antibiotic medicines.
  • In rare cases, a person who has severe dysphagia may need a feeding tube because he or she is not able to get enough food and liquids.